MR1100 – Marketing 1
Paul Tilley (Fall 2014)
MR1100 - Marketing 1

The Marketing 1 Course

Marketing 1 is an introductory course that will introduce you to some of the fundamental principles and practices of marketing. You will be introduced to strategic planning and marketing management, the internet (specifically Social Media) in marketing, marketing research information, consumer markets and behavior, business markets and behavior, market segmentation and targeting, and international marketing.

Topics We’ll Be Covering in Marketing 1

  1. 1. Introduction to Marketing
  2. 2. Strategic Planning and Marketing Management
  3. 3. Electronic Business in Marketing
  4. 4. The Marketing Environment
  5. 5. Marketing Research
  6. 6. Consumer Markets and Behaviors
  7. 7. Business Markets and Behaviors
  8. 8. Market Segmentation and Targeting
  9. 9. International Marketing

Resources You Will Be Using in Marketing 1

  • Text: Marketing: 9th (or 8th) Canadian Edition by Crane, Kerin, Hartley and Rudelius: McGraw Hill Ryerson


  • Course Facebook Site: Search/Like: Paul Tilley's Marketing Resource Page

  • MR1100 YouTube Videos


How You Will Be Evaluated in Marketing 1


Evaluation Item
Weight
Grade Achieved
Detail (Complete details of each project/test will be discussed/distributed in class)
Marketing Participation
5

You will be evaluated on your class attendance and involvement in the class discussion.
Marketing Research Project
10

You will be conducting marketing research as part of a large scale research project being conducted by the Centre for Public Engagement.
Group Marketing Plan
Presented during the last week of classes
15

You will be working with 2-3 fellow group members to develop a detailed, properly formatted marketing plan for either a project, a community, or a small business.
Your Group will have ½ a class to present the plan to the class during the last week of classes.
Midterm 1
Week 5
15

You will be tested on material covered in the first four (4) units course. The test will be one hour in duration, and be 60% Multiple Choice and 40% Short Answer questions.
See notes, videos etc. at http://paultilley.wikispaces.com/
Exam Time: Wed, Oct 15, 2014
2hrs
Exam Format:
Part 1 - 60 Multiple Choice Questions @ 1% Each
Part 2 – Choice of 4 of 5 Questions @ 15% each
Key Objectives covered on the exam:
  1. Discuss the essential requirements for successful marketing
  2. Identify the elements of the marketing mix
  3. Trace the evolution of marketing through the various eras of marketing.
  4. Describe and discuss the key elements of the strategic marketing process
  5. Discuss the concept of a business’ Mission, and business goals
  6. Discuss the importance of a marketing plan
  7. Discuss the concept of and the importance of an Environmental Scan to business
  8. Describe and discuss the five uncontrollable environmental forces
  9. Discuss what is meant by Demographics & Culture,
  10. Discuss what is meant by Economic Conditions,
  11. Discuss the Components of Consumer income,
  12. Discuss the impact of Technological change on business
  13. Discuss the basic forms of competition as well as the basic components of competition
  14. Discuss the concept of regulation – government imposed and self regulation.
  15. Discuss the significance of ethics in marketing
  16. Identify factors that influence ethical and unethical marketing decisions
  17. Recognize the importance of ethical and socially responsible consumer behaviour
  18. Discuss how Social Media can be used to support the marketing goals of the Marketing Orientation Era
Midterm 2
Week 9
15

You will be tested on material covered in units Five (5) through eight (8) of the course. The test will be one hour in duration, and be 60% Multiple Choice and 40% Short Answer questions.
Final Exam
During the Final Exam Period
40

This is a comprehensive exam consisting of material from throughout the course. The test will be two hours in duration, and be 40% Multiple Choice and 60% Case, Scenario and Short Answer questions.
Total
100




MR1100 – Marketing 1

Paul Tilley

Key Concepts:

Preface
Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  1. 1.
Overview of the Course Video
http://youtu.be/0RYp4O4hHNc

  1. 2.
Student Resources
1) Course Textbook – Crane: Marketing – 8th Canadian Edition
2) DL Online Course Material
3) Instructor Created Chapter Slides
4) Paul Tilley’s Chapter Description Videos
5) Paul Tilley’s Marketing Resource Facebook Page
Part 1 of 9 - Introduction to Marketing
Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  1. 1. Definition of Marketing
Paul Tilley’s Overview of Topic 1/Chapter 1 - Introduction
http://youtu.be/vLOxy2c7bCc
Text: Read Chapter 1 – Customer Value, Satisfaction, Relationships and Experiences
  1. 2. Requirements for Marketing to Occur
Paul Tilley’s Notes Slides for Chapter 1
http://paultilley.wikispaces.com/file/view/MR1100C1%20-%20Marketing%20Customer%20Value.ppt/265913436/MR1100C1%20-%20Marketing%20Customer%20Value.ppt
  1. 3. Fundamental Questions to be answered:
  • What is Marketing?
  • Who Markets?
  • What is Marketed?
  • Who buys and uses what is marketed?
  • Who benefits from Marketing?
Chapter 1 Slides - Introduction & Marketing Consumer Value
MR1100C1 - Marketing Customer Value.ppt
MR1100C1 - Marketing Customer Value.ppt
MR1100C1 - Marketing Customer Value.ppt


  1. 4. The influences on Marketing Activities


  1. 5. Customer needs versus customer wants


  1. 6. The 4P’s of Marketing
  • Product
  • Price
  • Promotion
  • Place


  1. 7. The Uncontrollable Factors of Marketing
  • Social/Cultural
  • Economics
  • Technology
  • Competition
  • Regulatory/Legal


  1. 8. The Evolution of Marketing
  • Production era
  • Sales era
  • Marketing Concept era
  • Marketing Orientation era
  • Social Media Era


  1. 9. Ethics and Social Responsibility in marketing


Part 2 of 9 - Strategic Planning and Marketing Management
Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  1. 10. Define “Organization” and describe its purpose
Paul Tilley’s Overview of Topic 2/Chapter 2 – Strategy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLOxy2c7bCc
Text: Read Chapter 2 – Develop Successful Marketing Strategies
  1. 11. What is Strategy
Paul Tilley’s Notes Slides for Chapter 2 - Strategy
http://paultilley.wikispaces.com/file/view/MR1100C2%20-%20Strategy.ppt/265913438/MR1100C2%20-%20Strategy.ppt

  1. 12. How organizations are structured to execute their chosen strategy
Chapter 2 Slides - Strategy
MR1100C2 - Strategy.ppt
MR1100C2 - Strategy.ppt
MR1100C2 - Strategy.ppt


****UNIT VIDEO**:** Dean Simon - Ski Hill Man - Business Strategy / SWOT analysis

Bombardier Website

Read:

A light goes on for General Electric

GE’s credit cards are gone; so are the microwaves. How one of America’s biggest corporations is trying to return to its industrial roots. Chris Sorensen
Maclean's September 16, 2014

  1. 13. Values, Mission and Goals


  1. 14. Tools used in setting Strategic Direction
  • Determining competencies
  • Business Portfolio Analysis
  • Market-Product Analysis
  • SWOT analysis
Video: King of the Hill – Watch the video and then perform a SWOT analysis on Dean’s Business http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btUlHcVcpcM

  1. 15. The Strategic Marketing Process
  • Plan
  • Implement
  • Evaluate


  1. 16. Developing a Marketing Plan


  1. 17.


Part 3 of 9 – E-Business
Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
Internet marketing strategies


The components of E-Business


Describe E-marketing domains


B2B (Business-to-Business)


B2C (Business-to-Consumer)


C2C (Consumer-to-Consumer


C2B (Consumer-to-Business)


Social Media Marketing








Part 4 of 9 – The Marketing Environment
Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  1. 1. Environmental Scanning Process

Text: Read Chapter 3 – Scanning the Marketing Environment
Evaluate Social forces in the Canadian context
Demographics
  • Population Characteristics
  • Population Trends
  • The influence of Culture
  • Cultural change
Chapter 3 Slides - The Changing Marketing Environment
MR1100C3 - Changing Marketing Environment.ppt
MR1100C3 - Changing Marketing Environment.ppt
MR1100C3 - Changing Marketing Environment.ppt


Evaluate Economic forces in the Canadian context
  • Macroeconomic condition
  • Consume income
Read: New report captures "Vital Signs" of the province Harris Centre: Memorial University. Video:



Evaluate Technological forces in the Canadian context
  • Impact of technology on markets
  • Impact of technology on customers


Evaluate Competitive forces in the Canadian context
  • Types of competition
  • Components of competition
  • Bricks/Mortar and Online competition


Evaluate Regulatory/legal forces in the Canadian context
  • Government’s role in protecting companies
  • Government’s role in protecting competition
  • Self-Regulation
  • The Rise of Consumerism


  1. 2. Marketing Ethics

Text: Read Chapter 4 – Marketing Ethics
  1. 1. Ethics and the Law


  1. 2. Ethical Marketing behaviour
  • Social and Cultural Norms
  • Business Culture
  • Corporate culture/code of ethics
Chapter 4 Slides - Ethics in Marketing
MR1100C4 - Marketing Ethics.ppt
MR1100C4 - Marketing Ethics.ppt
MR1100C4 - Marketing Ethics.ppt


  1. 3. Moral Idealism


  1. 4. Moral Utilitarianism


  1. 5. Concepts of Social Responsibility
  • Profit Responsibility
  • Stakeholder Responsibility
  • Societal responsibility


  1. 6. The Social Audit






MIDTERM EXAM – , Chapters 1-4 + e-marketing



Part 5 of 9 – Marketing Research

Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  1. 1. Types of Marketing Research
  • Exploratory research
  • Descriptive Research
  • Causal Research

Text: Read Chapters 8 – Marketing Research
  1. 2. The Marketing Research Process
1) Define Problem
2) Seek information (informal->Formal)
3) Develop a Formal Research Design/Plan
4) Surveys
5) Experiments
6) Observation
7) Collect Data (sample)
8) Analyze data
9) Draw evidence-based Conclusions
10) Communicate - deliver Report


  1. 3. Data Mining





Part 6 of 9 – Consumer Markets and Behaviors


Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
  • The Consumer Purchase Decision Process
    • Problem Recognition
    • Information Search
    • Evaluation of Alternatives
    • Purchase Decision
    • Post-Purchase Behaviour
Chapter 5 Notes - Consumer Purchase Decision Process
Unit 5 Chapter 5 Consumer Purchase Decision Notes.docx
Unit 5 Chapter 5 Consumer Purchase Decision Notes.docx
Unit 5 Chapter 5 Consumer Purchase Decision Notes.docx

Chapter 5 Slides - Consumer Purchase Decision Process
MR1100C5 - Consumer Behaviour.ppt
MR1100C5 - Consumer Behaviour.ppt
MR1100C5 - Consumer Behaviour.ppt

_
Text: Read Chapter 5 – Consumer Buying Behaviour
  • Involvement in the Purchase Decision Process
    • Extended Problem Solving
    • Limited Problem Solving
    • Routine Problem Solving


  • Situational influences in the Purchase Decision Process
  • The Purchase task
  • The Social Surroundings
  • The Physical Surroundings
  • The Temporal (Time Related) conditions
  • Antecedent (Consumer Related) States


  • Psychological influences in the Purchase Decision Process
  • Motivation(Maslow’s Hierarchy)
  • Personality
  • Perception
  • Learning (Behavioural, Cognitive, Brand Loyalty)
  • Values, Beliefs & attitudes (Compliment or Change)
  • Lifestyle


  • Socio-cultural influences in the Purchase Decision Process
  • Personal Influence
  • Reference Groups
  • Family
  • Social Class
  • Culture
  • Subculture


  • Marketing Mix influences in the Purchase Decision Process
  • The Product
  • The Price
  • The Promotion
  • The Place





Part 7 of 9 – Organizational Markets and Behaviors


Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
Industrial Markets
Chapter 6 Notes - Organizational Marketing (B2B, B2G)
Watch First **UNIT VIDEO** Challenger an Industrial Romance - Organizational Buying

Challenger: An Industrial Romance by Stephen Low, National Film Board of Canada



Update: See: Focus on the Plane http://youtu.be/Fne47xRra6g and Focus on Servicing the Plane http://youtu.be/xD5c-qvdU-0


Watch/read/listen
Business As Unusual: The World of B2B Advertising

Under the Influence

with Terry O'Reilly



Chapter 6 Slides - Organizational Marketing (B2B, B2G)
MR1100C6 - Organizational Markets.ppt
MR1100C6 - Organizational Markets.ppt
MR1100C6 - Organizational Markets.ppt

Text: Read Chapter 6 – Organizational Buying Behaviour
Reseller Markets


Government Markets


Global Markets


North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS)


Characteristics of Organizational Buying
  • Demand Characteristics
  • Size Characteristics
  • Number of Potential Buyers
  • Organizational Buying Objectives
  • Organizational Buying Criteria
  • Buyer Seller Relationships


The Role of a Buying Centre


Key Stages in the Organizational Buying Process
• Problem Recognition
• Information Search
• Evaluation of Alternatives
• Purchase Decision
• Post-Purchase Behaviour


Online Buying
  • E-commerce
  • Online Auctions





Part 8 of 9 – Market Segmentation & Targeting


Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
Market Segmentation Defined
MR1100C8 - Market Research.pptx
MR1100C8 - Market Research.pptx
MR1100C8 - Market Research.pptx


Video Part A -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ffUQHAUres&feature=share&list=UUaWy_c29yvFRpTmq03foI3w

Video Part B -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMlt_POPz0M&feature=share&list=UUaWy_c29yvFRpTmq03foI3w
Text: Read Chapter 9 – Market Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning
Target Marketing Defined


The Purpose of Segmenting Markets


Steps in Segmenting a Market into Targets
  • Group potential Buyers into segments
  • Group Products to be sold into categories
  • Develop a Market Product Grid to estimate relative market sizes
  • Based on the analysis, select key targets
  • Develop a plan to reach the identified targets
Chapter 9 - Segmenting, Targetting an Positioning
MR1100C9 - Segmenting.ppt
MR1100C9 - Segmenting.ppt
MR1100C9 - Segmenting.ppt


Positioning a Product to sell
  • Perceptual maps


Sales Forecasting
  • Judgements
  • Survey of knowledgeable groups
  • Statistical methods

MR1100 Marketing 1 – Midterm 2 Exam Preview Information

Paul Tilley**paul.tilley@cna.nl.ca**

Exam Time: Wednesday, November 26

Coverage: Comprehensive but with key focus on chapters 8 & 9

  1. Chapter 5 – Consumer Behavior

  2. Chapter 6 – Organizational Buying behavior

  3. Chapter 7 – Global Marketing

  4. Chapter 8 – Market Research

Exam Format:

Part 1 - 60 Multiple Choice Questions @ 60%

Part 2 – Part 2 - 4 of 5 Questions @ 40%

Key Objectives covered on the exam:

Describe and discuss the consumer purchase decision process.

• Explain each of the major influences on the consumer purchase decision.

• Discuss the basic characteristics of organizational buying

• Identify types of organizational buying situations

• Discuss the importance of international marketing in/to Canada

• Understand the implications of international marketing

• Examine the different techniques required to market internationally

• Define Marketing Research

• Explain why Marketing Research is conducted

• Discuss the types of Marketing Research

• Describe, discuss and complete the Marketing Research Process

• Discuss the various options for formal research design

• Describe and evaluate data collection techniques

• Describe the ethical issues surrounding the conduct of marketing research.



Course Project: Market Research

Hello everyone,

One of the deliverables in this course is the Marketing Research Project that we are doing with the Office of Public Engagement. Over the next 3 week you will be a key part of this project. Your task – to conduct real Research! Below is an outline of the project as well as a summary of what is expected of you. Please review this information prior to starting the project.

We will be ready to start the project during the week of November 10, and we need it completed by the Friday of the week of Nov 28. This project is worth 10% of your grade (10% for completed work) , and you will also be receiving a $50 stipend for this completed work.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with questions.

pt

The Project

As part of a broader sustainability initiative taken by your regional rural secretariat, you will be assisting in conducting a telephone survey on the Clarenville-Bonavista region. The survey is meant to gauge resident’s practices and perceptions with regards to long-term sustainability in their communities and their region. When we talk about sustainability, we mean social, environmental, and economic stability in the long run.
But first a little background from the Office of Public Engagement:
The Rural Secretariat provides recommendations for public policy advice on critical social, economic, cultural and environmental issues that impact the sustainability of that region. In 2013-2014, the Clarenville-Bonavista Regional Council (the “Regional Council’) expressed its interest in understanding what are the important elements of a strategy to sustain the people and communities of the region. The Regional Council is also interested in defining the barriers to regional sustainability. These interests determined the broader research questions for this study:
  1. What is our definition of sustainability and what outcomes would tell us we are there (or moving in the right direction)?
  2. What are the key factors or characteristics necessary for sustainability in the Clarenville-Bonavista region? What barriers exist?
  3. How can the Regional Council best proceed with determining which of these core sustainability factors currently exist, and what are the gaps?
    1. Based on public input and research results, what priorities, strategies and/or policy support are necessary to assist in moving towards sustainability in the Clarenville-Bonavista Region?

The key element for this research is a telephone survey of residents of the region. The survey will explore resident perspectives on the important sustainability issues in the region and strategies for moving towards enhanced sustainability in the future. This will ultimately inform the Regional Council’s recommendations to the Deputy Minister towards a broader sustainability approach.

Your assistance with this survey will help the Regional Council make these recommendations. Together, we hope to engage the public to start talking seriously about these types of issues so that we may consult the province, as well as within our communities, on ways we may work to achieve these sustainability goals.

We are excited to be working with you!

Survey Guide

The following is a step-by-step guide to conducting the survey.

  1. Please read over the survey to familiarize yourself with it’s content. It may appear “wordy,” but the information is actually quite simple. Try to imagine in your head how the survey might sound while talking with someone on the phone. Attempt to make the survey sound as “natural” and as much like a conversation as possible.

  1. i. Take the phoning list provided and start making your calls. These 50 phone numbers that you will call are taken at random from the phone book, representing a random sample of households in the region.

ii. Ask to speak to anyone in the household 18 years of age or older. It does not have to be a “head-of household” (ie. a parent). Once you have that person on the line, begin with the recruitment script to see if they are willing to participate in the survey.

iii. For every call you make on the Phoning List, document whether the survey was taken (“Taken”), the survey was refused (“Refused”), or there was no answer/the number was not in service (“N/A”).


  1. Enter the data into the online Fluid Survey. Fluid Survey is an online database that we use to enter the survey results. It is straightforward and intuitive. Our sustainability survey is found at the following link:

http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/ruralinfo/regional-sustainability-survey/


  1. Complete your phoning list and tally the amount of surveys you completed. The phoning list contains 50 telephone numbers, and the goal is for you to complete 10 surveys – that does not mean that we only want 10 surveys from you (obviously the more the better!), but that you will likely get people who are not interested or not home. Once you have completed your phoning list, please submit it to Paul Tilley with your name on it so that we can keep track of our surveying attempts.

Part 9 of 9 – Global Markets and International Business


Topic
Audio/Video/Web Links
Reading Links
The Dynamics of World Trade
Chapter 7 Notes - Global Marketing


**VIDEO** A Tast of the West: McDonald's in Russia - International Business
___
Text: Read Chapter 7 – Reaching Global Markets
The Elements of Competitive Advantage
  • Company Strategy, structure and rivalry
  • Demand Conditions
  • Factor Conditions
  • Related and Support industries


Trends in Global Enterprise
  • Reduced Protectionism
  • Increased Economic Integration
  • Global Competition
  • Global Networked links


Global Environmental Scan
Diverse Cultures
Divers customes
Different Symbols
Different Langaige
Economic differences
Stage of Economic Development
Economic infrastructure
Consumer purchasing Power
Currency Exchange
Political Climates
Political Risk
Trade Regulations


Exporting
Indirect Exporting
Direct Exporting


Licencing


Joint ventures


Direct Investment


Product Strategies


Product Strategies


Distribution Strategies


Pricing Strategies






MR1100 Marketing 1 – Final Exam Preview Information Fall 2014
Paul Tilley**paul.tilley@cna.nl.ca**
Final Exam
During the Final Exam Period
40

This is a comprehensive exam consisting of material from throughout the course. The test will be two hours in duration, and be 40% Multiple Choice and 60% Case, Scenario and Short Answer questions.

Exam Format:
Part 1 - 40 Multiple Choice Questions @ 40%
Part 2 – 1 Mandatory Question @ 20%
Part 3 - 2 of 3 Questions @ 20%
Part 4 - Case @ 20% (2 questions)

Comprehensive, including all objectives stated to-date with additional objectives covered since the last exam:
1. Types of Marketing Research
2. Describe, discuss and complete the Marketing Research Process
3. Discuss the various options for formal research design
4. Describe and evaluate data collection techniques
5. Describe the ethical issues surrounding the conduct of marketing research.
6. Explain what Market Segmentation is and when to use it
7. Identify and describe the steps involved in the Market Segmentation process
8. Describe the ways that markets can be segmented
9. Construct a Market Product Grid and use it to decide which markets to focus on.

Case:

CASE STUDY
East Coast Lifestyle earns an A+ in Marketing 101: Atlantic Canadians can’t get enough of a feel-good brand that started as a school project
by Josh Dehaas
It’s not often that a brand dreamed up for a class project gets 72,000 Facebook likes, 17,000 Instagram fans, 14,000 Twitter followers, and leads to 250,000 in sales of its products. But that’s how it worked out for 22-year-old Alex MacLean.
Last January, as part of an Acadia University entrepreneurship course, the marketing student launched East Coast Lifestyle, a line of casual clothing with a stylized anchor logo that evokes memories of summer days spent on the water. Atlantic Canadians became so enthralled with the brand there are now more than 11,000 photos tagged with #EastCoastLifestyle on Instagram, mostly of people “repping their coast,” as MacLean puts it, by wearing his stuff and posing from Machu Picchu to Dubai. His favourite photo is from closer to home: 26 members of a Newfoundland clan, aged four months to 84 years, wearing the matching hoodies and T-shirts they got for Christmas.
MacLean’s success is a reminder that strategies taught in business schools, such as social media marketing and social entrepreneurship, a model where businesses plan to have a positive social impact, can both quickly pay off. Michael Sheppard, the professor behind Venture Creation, teaches a systematic approach known as the “lean start-up model,” where the goal is to try out business ideas quickly and cheaply with a “minimally viable product.” MacLean had a hunch east coasters would get behind a brand meant to show off their regional pride, especially if it promised to give back to the community, so he borrowed $800 from his father and ordered 30 hoodies. While waiting for them to arrive, he prepped his social media channels and posted East Coast Lifestyle stickers all around campus. A few curious people found his Facebook page and asked what it was all about. When the hoodies arrived, he showed them the answer. The first 30 were sold mostly to friends, but the next order of 60 sold swiftly to strangers.
Spring break was coming up, so he designed and ordered tank tops and sold them to students heading south. Several in Cancun, Mexico, tagged their photos with #EastCoastLifestyle on Instagram and that’s when his social media strategy took off. MacLean reposted the photos to Twitter, Instagram and Facebook and asked his fans, “Where do you rep your East Coast Lifestyle?” More photos came in and so did more followers.
He paid back his father and donated 100 shirts to a local homeless shelter, making good on the promise he had made to give back. He made a video, set to hip hop, of his crew handing out the T-shirts, and shared it online. (He’s since done more charity work, including for S.M.I.L.E., a campus club that helps disabled children develop motor skills through athletics.)
Soon, Trey Lewis, captain of the Halifax Mooseheads major junior hockey team, messaged him on Twitter with a phone number and wrote that he wanted to place an order. Practically the whole team bought some clothing, including Nathan MacKinnon, who shared his photo on Facebook a few weeks before he was picked first in the NHL draft.
Months later, MacLean heard that even bigger sports celebrities were coming to town for training, including Team Canada captain and proud Nova Scotian Sidney Crosby. MacLean had a classmate who was working in the arena, so he asked him to take in a box of free merchandise. The friend obliged and the players dug in. MacLean ran out of large T-shirts by the time Crosby got there, so Crosby got the shirt off his back. It was a good thing he did; Crosby was photographed at a restaurant with an anchor on his chest and it was posted on Instagram, giving East Coast Lifestyle the type of publicity that usually costs big money. Sales took off. The clothing found its way to other NHL players, as well as rapper Classified, and Kim Coates, who plays Tig Trager on Sons of Anarchy.
Sheppard says MacLean’s sales were driven in part by his promise to give back. While plenty of businesses support charities, it’s easy for people to buy into the brand as a way to do so. “East Coast Lifestyle doesn’t just represent sailing and surfing, but caring for other people.”
Most of MacLean’s sales so far have been through Pseudio, a clothing chain in Atlantic Canada. Sheppard says there’s a risk that the local market will get saturated, but MacLean has a plan. After graduating in May, he’s going to drive down the east coast of the U.S. with friends and stop at beaches and festivals in Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Maryland and Florida, states where he’s already filling online orders. They’ll sell merchandise, take photos to hashtag, and meet with local clothing retailers. His other strategy is to diversify; he released a new line in January, where the anchor is replaced with a snow-topped mountain. After just a few weeks, West Coast Lifestyle already had 5,700 Instagram followers and counting.